Kit Gillet is a freelance journalist currently based in Bucharest. His work appears regularly in the international press, for publications including The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Economist, The Wall Street Journal, The Guardian, Foreign Policy and CNN.
Up Against the Wall

Up Against the Wall

Palestinians in the West Bank, quickly being sealed off behind a barrier, continue to live their lives in limbo. Kit Gillet looks at the reality on the ground following the collapse of the latest round of peace talks with Israel
Staying Power

Staying Power

In 2014 Romanians will have the right to work throughout the EU. Will everyone leave? The locals insist they want to stay and fix their nation.
Sichuan’s Tibetan Corner, Outside of Time

Sichuan’s Tibetan Corner, Outside of Time

Among the monks and novices of Tagong, a Tibetan community in neighbouring Sichuan province
City of Death and Life

City of Death and Life

For 6,000 people in the Philippine capital of Manila, living among the dead is preferable to running the gauntlet of the city’s crime-ridden slums. Kit Gillet reports
So, What’s It Like To Be Crucified?

So, What’s It Like To Be Crucified?

Enaje is visibly nervous, and with good reason. Tomorrow he will be strapped to a large wooden cross while thousands of people watch as 10-centimetre nails are driven through his palms and feet.
Delta Blues

Delta Blues

Kit Gillet journeys into the heart of Vietnam’s Mekong Delta and discovers the stark realities facing the poor farmers and fishermen already feeling the effects of rising sea levels
In China, foot binding slowly slips into history

In China, foot binding slowly slips into history

In the village of Liuyi, China, there are only about 30 women left who followed a once-common tradition that was painful but also bonded mothers and daughters.
Mao's Underground City

Mao’s Underground City

Under the streets of Beijing a warren of waterlogged and crumbling tunnels is all that is left of an underground city that was, just 40 years ago, expected to be a temporary home to 300,000 nuclear survivors.
Latest entries

Romanian President Calls for Premier to Resign Amid Graft Inquiry

Romanian president called for the resignation of the country’s prime minister after the country’s anticorruption agency opened criminal investigations into whether he was involved in forgery, money-laundering and other crimes when he was a lawyer
In tiny Moldova, hints of a 'federalized' Ukraine's future

In tiny Moldova, hints of a ‘federalized’ Ukraine’s future

Gagauzia, an autonomous region in southern Moldova, looks to Moscow before the West, much as Ukraine's restive east does. And the poor, agricultural region could show the problems a federalized Donbass might face.

The Missing Billion

A small European country wonders how such a staggering amount of cash could disappear from its banks.

Darjeeling, by Jeff Koehler

The Colourful History and Precarious Fate of the World's Greatest Tea

French-Romanian Wine Infusion

Eastern Europe isn’t known for its wines but that hasn’t stopped three French viticulturalists from founding a vineyard in southern Romania

How Skopje became Europe’s new capital of kitsch

Skopje’s new neo-classical splendour is divisive and expensive – not to mention of questionable taste. But one thing’s for sure: it’s made the Macedonian capital a truly surprising and impressive spectacle
A Balkans Romeo & Juliet

A Balkans Romeo & Juliet

More than 15 years after the bitter conflict, a staging of Shakespeare’s tragedy brings Kosovans and Serbians together to foster reconciliation

The Sympathizer, by Viet Thanh Nguyen

Viet Thanh Nguyen's debut novel delves into divided loyalties and fears for a double agent at the end of the Vietnam War

Postcard from… Pristina

March 27, 2015 At Pristina’s dreary bus station a small notice pinned to a scuffed white wall lists ten reasons Kosovans shouldn’t abandon their country – first among them that Kosovo will cease to exist without its people. It is a sobering reminder of what has been happening in Europe’s youngest nation since the beginning...

Romania gets serious about ending its notorious corruption

Romania's anticorruption taskforce is making great strides in one of Europe's most corrupt nations. Among the thousand-plus convicted last year are 24 mayors, five MPs, two ex-ministers, and a former prime minister.

Sculpture at heart of Romanian identity waits to hear her fate

Owners have to offer the state first refusal before selling the Wisdom of the Earth by Constantin Brâncuși – but they may be in for a long wait

In Romania, this woman was Arnie, Sly and Van Damme

Secret videos of movies from the west were a solace for many under Nicolae Ceausescu’s rule – and Irina Margareta Nistor dubbed thousands of them